Cystoid Macular Edema (Central Retina Swelling) – Houston, TX

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About CME

Cystoid macular edema (CME) occurs when abnormal fluid accumulates in the macula which is located in the center of the retina. This results in retinal thickening and the presence of cyst-like fluid collections that distort the normal retinal architecture and can impact vision. Our board-certified retina specialists at Retina Consultants of Houston are experienced in providing customized care for patients with CME, using a variety of targeted treatments.

Causes and Symptoms

Cystoid macular edema (CME) has many different causes, including:

• Eye surgery
• Diabetic retinopathy
• Retinal vein occlusion
Uveitis (inflammation of the eye)
Eye trauma
• Side effects of some medication

It commonly occurs after eye surgery. This is likely related to inflammation. About one to three percent of all cataract surgery patients will experience decreased vision due to CME, usually within a few months of surgery.

The most common symptoms of CME include:

• Blurred or distorted central vision
• Dim vision
• Decreased sensitivity to light

Sometimes patients with cystoid macular edema experience no symptoms at all.

Diagnosis

Your Retina Consultants of Houston physician may obtain multiple types of ocular imaging, including photography, ocular coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA) to facilitate diagnosis and treatment of your cystoid macular edema (CME). This includes addressing the underlying cause of your CME.

Treatment and Prognosis
Depending on the cause of your cystoid macular edema (CME), treatment may include some of the following:

• Anti-inflammatory medications, including steroid and/or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications in the form of eye drops, pills, or injections
• Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) medication like Avastin, Eylea or Lucentis
• Surgery such as vitrectomy
• Laser therapy

Diabetes, high blood pressure, and poorly controlled cholesterol can make cystoid macular edema worse and more difficult to treat. These cardiovascular risk factors should be optimally controlled under the guidance of your primary care physician.
Fortunately, most patients with CME can be successfully treated, and vision often improves, although the healing process can be slow and take several months.

Treatment and Prognosis

A patient's CME treatment will be personalized based on the extent of their conditions and the severity of their symptoms. Beginning with addressing the underlying cause of CME, your doctor will determine how best to treat both CME and the symptoms associated with the condition.

Depending on the cause of CME, treatment may include some of the following:

  • Anti-inflammatory medications including steroid and/or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications in the form of eye drops, pills, or injections
  • Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor medication
  • Surgery such as vitrectomy (to remove the vitreous gel)
  • Laser therapy

While each patient's results and prognosis are entirely unique, CME can often be treated with great success, often restoring and even improving the vision of the patient. 

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Treat CME

If you suspect that you may be suffering from CME, or would like more information on the condition, we invite you to contact Retina Consultants of Houston at your earliest convenience. Fortunately, most patients with CME can be successfully treated and vision often improves, although the healing process can be slow and take several months. Our skilled staff and highly advanced technology assist us in the diagnosis and treatment of CME with optimum results and successful outcomes. Deteriorating vision should not be something you live with. Call us today to schedule your consultation. 

*Individual results are not guaranteed and may vary from person to person. Images may contain models.